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Posts Tagged ‘Rosemerry Wahtola Trommer’

Aspen Poetry Workshop

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Back in high school English class, you probably learned how poets spoke for their time—how the literature of the day reflected all that was happening politically, culturally, spiritually and economically. Who’s speaking for us today? In this five-week course, we’ll take a look at the five most recent U.S. poet laureates: Philip Levine, Natasha Trethewey, Charles Wright, Juan Felipe Herrera, and Tracy K. Smith. Appointed annually by the librarian of Congress, the official job description of the Poet Laureate is to raise the national consciousness to a greater appreciation of the reading and writing of poetry. But the Poet Laureate, who is selected by a committee that includes the current Laureate and distinguished poetry critics, is someone who represents the prevailing poetry aesthetic. What do your laureates have to say about you? And what do you think of them? And what, in fifty years, will high school students have to say about how these poets spoke to our time here on this planet, in this country?

Guiding you on this journey through the Laureates is Western Slope poet laureate emeritus Rosemerry Wahtola Trommer. Her master’s degree is in English Language and Linguistics, and for 10 years, she directed the Telluride Writers Guild. She has written a poem a day for several years, and her poems have been featured in O Magazine and on A Prairie Home Companion. Her books include The Less I Holdand The Miracle Already Happening.  Visit her website, www.wordwoman.com for writing exercises and essays on the art of writing.

Registration for the 5 week series is $160.

For more information, visit https://www.weehawkenarts.org/all-classes/224-lightning-rods-for-the-muse-america-s-most-recent-poet-laureates-with-rosemerry-wahtola-trommer

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I love the practice of Ekphrasis–the art of writing poems for other works of art. One of my favorite poetry journals, Rattle, has a monthly Ekphrastic Challenge, in which they invite poets to write poems for a piece of art, which the editors select. This month, one of my poems was selected by the editor, Tim Green. You can find the poem and the artwork by Samantha Gee here . Want to try your own hand at an Ekphrastic poem? It’s fun! You can find the monthly challenge here .

 

 

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No matter how difficult the world may be, how hostile, how ferocious, there is always the invitation for gratitude. Thank you to Gratefulness.org, a site devoted to finding and sharing what’s right in the world, who today posted this poem of mine about finding this invitation–Obeying the Impulse

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…in a time seemingly hellbent on hate? That’s what Phil Woods and I both explored through poems last week in our responses to Charlottesville. Please check out the poems today in the Colorado Independent. To read them, click news poetry. And please, if you are up for it, write a response. We need more conversations about what’s happening.

 

All the best,

Rosemerry

 

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If you’re considering a poetry practice, please, read this blog post written by Shelley Widhalm. Shelley is a writer and editor who participated in a poetry playshop I led in Loveland two weekends ago, and I couldn’t be more thrilled about the way she took up the challenge to write poems for 30 days as a daily practice. And I love how she pulls details from what other participants said, from what I said, and from her own experience.

If you are interested in guidance and encouragement for your own poetry practice, let me know. I will be taking two new students in September. You can read more about these poetry one-on-one conversations here.

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